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that has been taken up by our unfunded government programs. that is the number one cause of our fiscal and debt problem and it's not going away. so it looks like 2013 is going to be real. it's going to be dealing with issues of peace and war, national identity and issues of personal security. you think it's not important? say it and you're part of the problem. and that's "hardball" for now. th thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the gop is in denial and they're scrambling to make a deal. the only problem? they still haven't learned that they're going to have to compromise. just hours ago, president obama returned home from christmas vacation. looking to jump start negotiations and protect millions from seeing their taxes go up. the news comes after a conference call that mr. boehner held with gop house members, telling them to return to washington this sunday. but just because they're coming back doesn't mean they're looking to play nice. today, senator harry reid blasted the s
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
and the government runs out of money. >> that's where i feel all the eyes are on capitol hill. saying you can't do this with the fiscal cliff. what a two months that will be. thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. joining me here in the studio with our first reads of the day, senior political editor mark murray. welcome. back and forth from the harry reid. we have congressional ping pong going on. you said it is time for house republicans to put middle class families first bypassing the senate's bill to protect 98% of americans on january 1st. the senate bill could pass tomorrow if the house republicans would lead it come to the floor. the house had two bills that collectively can avert the entire fiscal cliff if enacted. those bills await action by the senate. >> the classic ping pong gridlock and no way out. >> it's important to know how far we have come in the last seven days. a week ago we were closer than we had seen before on a particular deal. john boehner made a big concession allowing tax cuts to rise on income over a million dollars. president obama countered with a big concess
year's was in 1996. that is, of course, when they were dealing with the government shut down. politics will be put aside this morning. the president, a lot of members of congress will be attending that memorial service for the late senator. >> kristen welker in hawaii. we will check in with you again later in our show. >>> from the fiscal cliff to gun control nra executive vice president was on "meet the press" this morning and here is part of what he said. >> i don't understand why you can't just for a minute imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school that if a good guy with a gun would have been there he might have been able to stop it. >> nbc news editor is with me in the studio. there were armed guards at columbine. >> we know the nra is going to dig in. nothing is going to change until the other side can show that it can win these kinds of arguments. we saw this with environmental regulations in the 70s. you saw this in the 90s with the assault weapons ban. i think a lot of democrats got spooked after the mid 90s because so many of them l
value, at the turn of the 20th century where government spending was 9% of gdp, we're now at 25%. there are some that say, take what we give you and retrofit government to the size of 19% or 20%. do that first. he just wants to shrink what it's grown to, this unwielding federal government that -- don't you think 25% needs to come down? >> well, part of that is cyclical. >> okay. so at 3%? >> 21, 22. >> i would say 22. >> so we have to get it down to 20.5. >> the three big beasts in the budget remain medicare/medicaid, social security and defense. you have to cut almost everything else to zero to get close to balance or to make a big difference. so i think in today's world, given that those entitlements, even if you reform them and cut back back will increase as people like us eventually retire. it seems to me that sizing the government for something around 22 or so is probably doable. but not easy to get to. because you still have to have major cuts and major long titlement reform to get there. >> you see one of the major ceo guys, and i'm not going to quote which one, said yest
this israeli government is so spoiled and has shift sod far to the right it makes no effort to take u.s. interest into account. and i agree with that. when netanyahu moved and cut off any chance of a united west bank government, he basically took a step that was completely in the face of u.s. policy going back to george w. bush. >> that's true. i think one of the things to be keep in mind is this pre-nomination process seems to have gotten completely out of control. where congress has too much to say who the presumptive nominees that any president offers forth. over history only 20 cabinet nominees have been knocked back. seven have been rejected and 13 have withdrawn those names. seven of those have happened under the past three administrations. so i think there's something wrong with this whole process where a presumptive nominee is litigated in public and the -- >> how do you avoid this? how do you do it? >> he's got to make a decision. obama has either got to nominate him when he gets back to washington tomorrow or move on. >> is this the vetting process we've got now? in other wo
. if they want to. they have the right to protect themselves. the government cannot protect us. they can't be everywhere all the time. the government has delusional thinking. >> it's such a complicating subject and i hate to play into the sound bite. we're 5% of the world's population and we've got 50% of the guns. >> you know, today i think the nra planted a flag on planet bizarro. i hate to use a sound bite like that. but we have more guns in this country and we have more gun violence in this country than any other western industrialized nation and they don't see a link and, in fact, what they then say is, we need more guns like our guest just said. that's the world we live in. we live in a world where everyone around the country has mentally deranged people, violent movie games, violent music as we do, and yet they don't have the number of guns we have and strikingly, oddly enough they don't have the same gun violence that we do. i don't know why that point escapes wayne lapierre. and our guest on the show tonight. >> mr. siebold, i feel naive. i'm confused. i expected the nra to embr
would only fund the government for eight days. >> the senate is set to reconvene sunday at 1:00 eastern time. the house expected to be in session sunday. are going to start around 2:00 with the first votes coming around 6:30 p.m. let's head on over to the white house. kristen welker standing by. a lot happening in washington, d.c. a lot happening i would assume at the white house. but how engaged is the presidented to in moving this thing forward? >> reporter: good afternoon, t.j. i am told there are conversations going on at the staff level. as you know, he met with congressional leaders here at the white house for about an hour on friday. now sources who are familiar with that conversation tell me that the president essentially said to lawmakers, you have two options. one, come up with a plan that can make its way through both chambers, or allow his proposal to go through a vote in both chambers. and that's what you heard the president referencing in that sound bite that you just aired, t.j. in the president's proposal it calls for extending the bush era tax cuts for those making $250
it in their paycheck and they will after january 1. the government will be taking more out of their paychecks and when the tax time will roll by in april, they'll feel it and businesses will feel it. once people will see they're losing money on this deal you'll see more public outrage about it. >> david naka, mura, calling for an up or down vote if the senate can't come up with it. he's talking about 250,000, at one point 400,000. is it realistic to think that the president can win this thing on an up or down vote? >> if they actually go to an up and down vote there will be a lot of pressure on those who were against a temporary fix with this to make their case known and actually go on the record. that's why the question is would the republican senators who would oppose this thing at the $250,000 level, they would use some of the mechanisms they have like the fill buster and things that the public doesn't like, but they're certainly part of the tools that the senators have to object to these things. would they block it? as mark murray said, this is about the blame game and setting up and if you'll blo
budget cuts coming down to certainly state and local governments, not a good thing. and so this seemingly bad game of chicken, you know, this is not some schoolyard game here. this is about people's lives, it's about their livelihoods, it's about the future of cities, it's about programs that need the dollars to provide services that the citizens want and expect is lack of doing your job. and so congress, it seems to me, should be flying, literally, back into session to get things done. the marketplace will not reward this inactivity, but more importantly, the psychological confidence that citizens and the business community should have about the ability of congress and washington to actually get stuff done will, again, be shaken. it was mentioned, jonathan mentioned earlier, you mentioned earlier summer of 2011, a useless debate about whether or not we should raise the debt ceiling, had been done 36 times, but we had to have an inane debate about that. now it's the fiscal cliff. and whether or not across the board cuts should be made to all kinds of services and programs because the supe
norquist and his pledge? >> it's odd because grover was the one sort of outside government institution on the conservative side who agreed with speaker boehner's plan "b" which would have allowed taxes to go up above $1 million in income. all the other conservative groups say no. i think grover's pledge, i don't know where it goes from here. obviously is doesn't have as much teeth as is it did because there are people who are willing to buck it. >> i think the key thing with the grover pledge though is that republicans feel like they're in such a corner here, the house is in disarray, boehner doesn't really know where his caucus is going to go. they're not really worried about grover's pledge. they're more worried about rebuilding the party and surviving this horrible moment when they barely control one chamber. >> okay. so i want to run this by you. charles krauthammer from "the washington post" has suggested this kind of complicated theory that the president has a bigger plan here. wonder if we can play this tape of what he says the president's strategy is. >> he's been using this, a
vocal. >> they are important when you have a system of government in the house where you have to pass things. the majority itself. the majority of the majority. that was pretty much in effect when democrats controlled for 40 years as well. there were rare occasions. president clinton massed nafta, the free trade agreement in 1993. the majority of republican votes for it and democrats against it. it's only 20 votes, but that is the difference between boehner getting what he wants and not. if he loses, he can only lose fewer than that in january. he needs a bill that commands a lot of democratic support. >> people say it will be one of the most powerful people. it will be more powerful because she has the upper hand and she knows it. she will have to deal with it at least 75 to 100 votes. >> and again the marks sustain this idea of okay, this new more moderate congress coming in and these voices will be put down to a degree or will we see dire financial implications off the bat? >> the lesser because even if they managed to harsh out the small deal that president obama is putting forwar
financial gifts from the government, and then work very aggressively to turn them out to vote, and that strategy worked. >> that explanation got mitt romney attacked and condemned by the likes of bobby jindahl and other republicans. they're now trying a new approach. tag romney said this about his father. he wanted to be president less than anyone i knew in my entire life. he had no desire to run, says tag, who worked with his mother and to persuade his father to seek the presidency. if he could have found someone else to take his place, he would have been ecstatic to step aside. too bad he never told newt gingrich that. joining me now, msnbc's joy reed. i'm on the verge of feeling sorry for them, trying to come up with these crazy reasons about why he lost. and now they want to pretend that this guy who lived his whole life in order to run for president didn't really want to run for president. >> yeah, i know, lawrence. there is nothing more failing than failing to win something and say, i didn't want to win, anyway. who wants that. the problem with that, of course, is the hi
and oversight and government reform committee chairman tom davis. hello, gentlemen. nice to have you back. >> good morning. >> representative frost, we heard senator barroso there. does president obama want to go over the cliff? >> no, i don't believe that at all, alex. i've talked to people at a high level of the white house. they are concerned the effect this could have on the stock market, on our economy generally as well as the world markets. they don't want to go over the cliff. they've made a reasonable offer. they've moved to $400,000 as a cutoff, let everybody under that amount have their tax cuts. i feel sorry for speaker boehner who couldn't deliver his own party. if he'd been able to do that, at least somebody would have headed over to the senate and there could have been action. senate has to originate something. up to mitch mcconnell and harry reid to figure out something, send it back to the republicans in the house and hope enough will join democrat and vote for it. >> given the reasons for which mr. boehner was unable to deliver his own caucus in the house, do you think an
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)